Nov 18, 2019
DAILY NEWS ONLINEABOUTCONTACT

Africa Archives - Daily Mail Online

images-42.jpeg

October 19, 20196350

The Ghana Union of Traders Association (GUTA) is calling for a total boycott of all Nigerian products imported to Ghana.

The move, the traders union believes, will force the Nigerian government to open up its land borders for foreign goods. Nigeria partially shut its borders since August.

According to Ghanaweb, Greater Accra Regional Secretary of GUTA, David Kwadwo Amoateng on Adom FM’s morning show, Dwaso Nsem, Friday said the Nigerian government has not been fair to foreign traders.

In return, he expects the Ghana government to prevent Nigerian traders from bringing goods into Ghana, but that plea has fallen on deaf ears.

“Either somebody’s bread has been buttered or we are cowards. Government is not being fair to us,” he fumed.


IMG_20191014_104431.jpg

October 14, 201940

Rivers State Governor, Nyesom Wike urges the management of Ethiopian to fly Port Harcourt route to the outside world especially the Far East Asia.

He said this after undertaking a facility tour of he airlines in Addis Ababa.

He returned to Nigeria over the weekend.

Wike who was followed by some officials of his government posted pictures of the tour.

He wrote on official Twitter handle, “On a Facility Tour at Ethiopian Airlines in Addis Ababa.

“I and my delegation are being briefed on the capacity of Ethiopian Airlines to Service the Port Harcourt-Addis Ababa International Route.”

He added: “This route is a gateway to the Middle East and Far East Asia.”



October 7, 201970

Vietnam seems to be the consensus pick for winner of the U.S.-China trade war, as Chinese and other manufacturers shift production to the cheaper Southeast Asian nation. If there’s a loser, at least in terms of missed opportunities, it may be the countries of South Asia.

To understand why, remember that the trade war has only accelerated an important trend a decade in the making. Faced with rising costs, Chinese manufacturers must decide whether to invest in labor-saving automation technologies or to relocate. Those choosing the latter present an enormous opportunity for less-developed countries, as Chinese companies can help spark industrialization and much-needed economic transformation in their new homes.

There may not be another such chance this generation. The only proven pathway to long-lasting, broad-based prosperity has been to build a manufacturing sector linked to global value chains, which raises productivity levels and creates knock-on jobs across the whole economy. This was how most rich nations, not to mention China itself, lifted themselves out of poverty.

Yet the evidence suggests that South Asian countries are lagging behind in attracting manufacturing investment. It’s not just Vietnam that’s racing ahead. African countries, too, are making manufacturing a top priority. Ethiopia alone has openednearly a dozen industrial parks in recent years and set up a world-class government agency to attract foreign investment. The World Bank has lauded sub-Saharan Africa as the region with the highest number of reforms each year since 2012.

A Chinese factory in Ethiopia.
Photographer: Jenny Vaughan/AFP/Getty Images

Vietnam seems to be the consensus pick for winner of the U.S.-China trade war, as Chinese and other manufacturers shift production to the cheaper Southeast Asian nation. If there’s a loser, at least in terms of missed opportunities, it may be the countries of South Asia.

To understand why, remember that the trade war has only accelerated an important trend a decade in the making. Faced with rising costs, Chinese manufacturers must decide whether to invest in labor-saving automation technologies or to relocate. Those choosing the latter present an enormous opportunity for less-developed countries, as Chinese companies can help spark industrialization and much-needed economic transformation in their new homes.

There may not be another such chance this generation. The only proven pathway to long-lasting, broad-based prosperity has been to build a manufacturing sector linked to global value chains, which raises productivity levels and creates knock-on jobs across the whole economy. This was how most rich nations, not to mention China itself, lifted themselves out of poverty.

Yet the evidence suggests that South Asian countries are lagging behind in attracting manufacturing investment. It’s not just Vietnam that’s racing ahead. African countries, too, are making manufacturing a top priority. Ethiopia alone has openednearly a dozen industrial parks in recent years and set up a world-class government agency to attract foreign investment. The World Bank has lauded sub-Saharan Africa as the region with the highest number of reforms each year since 2012.

By contrast, in terms of foreign direct investment as a percentage of GDP, South Asia lags both the global average for least-developed countries and sub-Saharan Africa. While South Asia’s total GDP is more than 70% greater than Africa’s, the continent received three-and-a-half times the investment from China that South Asia received in 2012, the most recent year for which the United Nations has publishedbilateral FDI statistics. In the last five years, the American Enterprise Institute’s China Global Investment Tracker has recorded 13 large Chinese investment deals in Africa and only nine in South Asia.

The World’s Next Factory Won’t Be in South Asia

The region is losing out to Africa and elsewhere in the race to attract manufacturing investment.

A Chinese factory in Ethiopia.
Photographer: Jenny Vaughan/AFP/Getty Images

Vietnam seems to be the consensus pick for winner of the U.S.-China trade war, as Chinese and other manufacturers shift production to the cheaper Southeast Asian nation. If there’s a loser, at least in terms of missed opportunities, it may be the countries of South Asia.

To understand why, remember that the trade war has only accelerated an important trend a decade in the making. Faced with rising costs, Chinese manufacturers must decide whether to invest in labor-saving automation technologies or to relocate. Those choosing the latter present an enormous opportunity for less-developed countries, as Chinese companies can help spark industrialization and much-needed economic transformation in their new homes.

There may not be another such chance this generation. The only proven pathway to long-lasting, broad-based prosperity has been to build a manufacturing sector linked to global value chains, which raises productivity levels and creates knock-on jobs across the whole economy. This was how most rich nations, not to mention China itself, lifted themselves out of poverty.

Yet the evidence suggests that South Asian countries are lagging behind in attracting manufacturing investment. It’s not just Vietnam that’s racing ahead. African countries, too, are making manufacturing a top priority. Ethiopia alone has openednearly a dozen industrial parks in recent years and set up a world-class government agency to attract foreign investment. The World Bank has lauded sub-Saharan Africa as the region with the highest number of reforms each year since 2012.

By contrast, in terms of foreign direct investment as a percentage of GDP, South Asia lags both the global average for least-developed countries and sub-Saharan Africa. While South Asia’s total GDP is more than 70% greater than Africa’s, the continent received three-and-a-half times the investment from China that South Asia received in 2012, the most recent year for which the United Nations has publishedbilateral FDI statistics. In the last five years, the American Enterprise Institute’s China Global Investment Tracker has recorded 13 large Chinese investment deals in Africa and only nine in South Asia.

Bangladesh is a striking illustration of the problem. The country needs to create 2 million jobs per year at home just to keep up with its growing population. Yet, despite a world-class garments manufacturing sector, it seems unable to cut red tape and enact the reforms needed to attract investment to diversify beyond apparel. In the past few years, Bangladesh has fallen to 176 out of 190 countries in the global Ease of Doing Business country rankings. DBL Group, a Bangladeshi company, is investing in a new apparel manufacturing facility that will generate 4,000 jobs — in Ethiopia.

The fantasy, most common in India, that a country might somehow “leapfrog” from a rural, agriculture-heavy economy straight to a services-based economy is just that: a fantasy. South Asia can’t afford to lose this chance to grow its manufacturing sector.

Attracting manufacturing investments will require, first and foremost, that governments in the region acknowledge the competition is passing them by. India, for example, must abandon its overconfidencethat investors will come simply for its large population. Pakistan needs to stop relying on its government-to-government friendship with China. Chinese state financing of infrastructure won’t automatically lead to manufacturing investment, most of which is dominated by private Chinese companies motivated by competitive forces, not government diktats.

Secondly, South Asian countries need to undertake a concerted, whole-of-government push to boost investment levels. Specifically, they need to create the conditions manufacturers need to thrive, from steady power supplies to efficient port operations and customs clearance.

Moreover, they need to understand the specifics of these businesses. Factories have unique requirements depending on what they make. For example, cloth and clothing factories, despite their seeming similarities, have extremely different requirements: The former is capital-intensive, with huge amounts of power-hungry machinery churning out bolts of cloth, whereas the latter is labor-intensive and features rows of workers cutting and sewing.

Countries need to analyze which manufacturing sub-sectors they are best positioned for, meet the requirements those manufacturers have in order to set up shop, and target the regions of China (and elsewhere in the world) where those types of manufacturers are to be found.

The good news is that all of these measures are eminently feasible. And in many cases, the first steps are already being taken, such as with the construction of Bangladesh’s first deep sea port at Matarbari. The bad news is that unless South Asia moves faster, others may have already seized the opportunity to industrialize. (Irene Yuan Sun for Bloomberg).


images-16.jpeg

October 3, 201950

Paschal Emeka, Abuja

An investment and trade facilitation expert Engr. Ndipayya Batta has described the recent upsurge of xenophobic attacks against Nigerians and other African living in South Africa as well as hostile attitude of other African countries as detrimental and inimical to the African Continental Free Trade Agreement, AFCFTA.

Speaking to Daily Mail in an interview in Abuja, Engr. Battah who is head project MINE in the Federal Ministry of Industry, Trade and Investment noted that with the Afrophobia in some parts of Africa implementing the AFCFTA will be an uphill task.

“They are making a mockery of the AFCFTA. Nigerian business men have at various times contended with all kinds of hostilities in several African countries. The AFCTA is designed to ensure free movement of goods and services, targeting a particular people or group of people will negatively affect the continent’s economy.

He decried subtle hostile policy of some African countries targeted against fellow Africans and warned that if the African Union did nothing to stem the tide, inter African trade and investment will suffer a huge set back.

While commending the federal government’s response to the latest xenophobic attacks as well as evacuation of those who want to return back to the country, Engr. Battah however proposed a stronger sanction against South African to serve as a deterrent to other African countries.


IMG_20191003_150801.png

October 3, 201930

Controversial Ghanaian, Shatta Bandle, whose occupation remains shrouded in secrecy has allegedly acquired a new car for his bouncer worth 45,000 million US Dollars.

The young rich, brief and funny talking Ghanaian received the car after a successful shipment from the US.

He said of the car that came with the US plate number, “I guess you people miss my bouncer, well I didn’t sack him from work, I sent him to the gym to do more training to bounce my enemies.

“I just bought him a new car for bouncing my enemies better. @shatta_bandles_bouncer Nothing but joy. Your money your power”, he bragged.

He’s often comparing himself to African richest man, Aliko Dangote implying that he’s richer than anyone else in the continent, a claim he’s often laughed at.

 


360x-1.jpg

September 29, 2019130

The national coordinator of one of Rwanda’s main opposition movements was killed Monday, the third member of the United Democratic Forces to either disappear or be found murdered this year.

Syridio Dusabumuremyi was stabbed to death in his shop in the country’s southern Muhanga district by unidentified people, the Rwanda Investigation Bureau said on its Twitter account. Two suspects have been arrested and investigations are ongoing, spokeswoman Modeste Mbabazi said by phone.

UDF leader Victoire Ingabire confirmed the killing, saying she believes the attack was premeditated. In March, the body of a party member who had traveled to the northwest to visit his parents was discovered in a forest. Another member has been missing since July.

“I strongly believe these are coordinated attacks and it looks like other targeted killings of the opposition members,” she said by phone from the capital, Kigali. “These killings should stop.”

Human-rights groups have repeatedly accused President Paul Kagame’s government of cracking down on political opponents and the media. Amnesty International said in a statement that Monday’s killing was “extremely alarming” and urged the authorities to conduct an independent investigation into what it described as “numerous suspicious attacks.”

“It is essential that the government of Rwanda protects the rights to freedom of expression and association, including for opposition politicians, and ends the current climate of harassment and intimidation they face,” the U.K.-based rights group said.

Ingabire, a one-time presidential candidate, was jailed for 15 years in 2013 for conspiring against the government before being pardoned last year. She hasn’t been allowed to officially register the United Democratic Forces as a party. The movement’s vice president hasn’t been seen since he allegedly escaped from a maximum-security prison in October last year. (Bloomberg).


740x-1.jpg

September 29, 2019130

Cars and minibuses stuck in grinding traffic cause many a missed meeting in Kenya’s capital, potentially costing East Africa’s largest economy almost $1 billion a year in lost productivity.

That’s according to the Nairobi Metropolitan Area Transport Authority, which ranked Nairobi as the world’s fourth most congested city. In a new report, it put the average travel time in the city — home to 3.2 million people — at 57 minutes, and recommended a Bus Rapid Transit System for five key routes to stem the gridlock.

“Lack of a scheduled public transport system and an elaborate non-motorized transport network forces people to use personal vehicles over short distances, whereas they would have otherwise walked, cycled or used public transport,” according to the Nairobi Metropolitan Area Transport Authority.

What is the way out of the gridlock? The agency intends to create exclusive lanes for scheduled commuter transport to cut travel time to and from the central business district of Nairobi, once referred to as the city in the sun. (Bloomberg).

 



About us

Daily Mail Africa is an online news media published by FINT Nigeria in February, 2017 to deliver objective news on the spot and undertake unbiased news analyses presenting Africa before the world. We are Independent and a non-partisan media group driven by the pursuit of truth and excellent journalism. We would always be impartial by sustaining our integrity through objectivity and defend the common goods.


+234 907 888 9988

dailymailngr@gmail.com



Latest tweets